Diwali – The Biggest Festival in India

Diwali (Deepavali) is the Hindu festival of lights, which is celebrated every autumn. The preparations and rituals for the festival typically last five days throughout not only in India but also Indian communities all around the world. In 2018, Diwali take place from November 5th to November 9th.

The origin of  Diwali festival

Diwali meaning the victory of light over darkness, good over evil and knowledge over ignorance. Depending on the region in India, the interpretation of the origins of this festival will be different. However, in general, Diwali's origins stem from the mythological beliefs of gods.

For example, the myth of Krishna's victory over the goddess Narakasura, has become the symbol of the victory between good and evil. Or the legend of Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth and prosperity and Ganesha, symbolizes wisdom andhappiness. In some places, Diwali is also dedicated to the king Ram, symbol of virtue and faithfulness in Indian epics.

Picture 1 - People dropping lanterns in Diwali festival

Picture 1 - People dropping lanterns in Diwali festival

Five days filled with the light of Diwali

Day 1:

The first day of Diwali is called Dhan Teras. Leading up to this day, houses and businesses are cleaned and decorated. Floors are decorated with bright, geometric patterns called rangoli, which serve as symbols of good luck and welcome guests and Lakshmi.

On this day, Indians buy a large number of gold, silver and precious stones, ornaments, new clothes and utensils. In the evening, people light up earthen lamps outside their home.

Picture 2 -  Indian buying gold in the first day of Diwali

  Picture 2 -  Indian buying gold in the first day of Diwali

Day 2: 

The second day of Diwali week is called the Kali Chaudas or Narak Chaturdasi. On this day, it is believed that one should massage the body with oil to relieve it of tiredness, bathe and rest.

Picture 3- People staying at home and relaxing 

Day 3

The third day of these festivities is the actual Diwali/ Deepawali. People light diyas and candles in their homes, and the streets all across India light up with millions of sparklers, crackers and fairy lights. After worshipping MahaLakshmi in the evening with their families, people visit temples to light candles. They also exchange sweets as prasaad.

Picture 4 - The most important night in Diwali festival

Picture 4 - The most important night in Diwali festival

Day 4: 

The forth day is celebrated in various forms all across India. In Northern states of India, this day is widely called as Govardhan Pooja and Vishwakarma Day, when people worship their instruments, arms and machinery. Husbands give gifts to their wives on this day.  

Picture 5 - Street is decorated in Diwali festival

Picture 5 - Street is decorated in Diwali festival

Day 5: 

The fifth day of Diwali festivities is celebrated as the Bhai Teeka. Brothers visit their sisters on this day, and the sisters celebrate and prepare sweets especially in honour of their brothers, wishing a long, happy, healthy life and great success for them. This day marks the end of the five days of Diwali/Deepavali celebrations.

Picture 6- Relative visit each other 

Picture 6- Relative visit each other 

Meaning of the festival

Diwali festival has the original meaning of celebrating the victory of good and the come over the dark. Moreover, it is also a time for everyone to feel the warmth of festive atmosphere, to join in the joys and pray to gods together to give good things to everyone.
It can be said, living and experiencing India these days will give us more insights into people and culture in India. If you want to come and immersed in this atmosphere at Diwali festival 2018, contact us to be provided the fastest visa to India.

 

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